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How To Rail Berms Standing Up | How To

Former Yamaha factory rider Cheyne Boyd now operates Park4MX in Broadford, Vic where he still shows people a thing or two about corners, including how to build them.

1: POSITION
As you approach the corner, you want to ensure that you are in the correct position. You need to be standing in an aggressive “attack” position and central on the bike. You also want to assess the condition of the berm and choose the correct line. If you go too high and the berm isn’t in good nick, it can blow out, resulting in you going off the track or tucking the front.

2: GRIP THE BIKE
Coming into the corner, you need to grip the bike with your knees and absorb any braking bumps. Just before you reach the beginning of the corner, you want to start to tip it in. Remember to stick to your chosen line and stay in the attack position.

3: STAY CENTRAL
From the start of the corner to the middle, you want to try and stay central on the bike. Remain in the attack position and keep your knees gripped. Always look through the corner and not down at the front guard. Keep the power nice and smooth.

4: ROLL ON THE POWER
As you reach the middle of the corner, you want to start to roll on the power. As you accelerate, you have to move your body weight forward on the bike. Use your upper body strength to keep yourself forward, otherwise you will slide back on the bike and unload the front tyre.

5: LOOK AHEAD
Remember to keep looking through the corner. This will help you steer the bike more easily and help you exit the corner in the right place. Continue to accelerate through the turn. With standing, there is always the risk of tucking the front, so stay comfortable, confident and centralised on the bike, not swinging over the back wheel.

6: POWER ON
Accelerate out of the corner and into the next section while straightening the bike. Standing through corners allows you to carry more speed through the corner and sets you up better for the next section.

Quick Tips

Standing up allows you to carry more speed through a corner. It also helps you conserve energy that would be used moving from the seated to standing position.
Standing requires a strong back.
The main difference between sand and hardpack is body position. In sand, you need to be further back on the bike, in order to keep the front-end light so it doesn’t dig in to the sand. Hardpack allows you to be more forward on the bike.
The more open the corner, the better it is to stand. On a tighter corner, sitting may be the better option. With standing, there is always the risk of tucking the front, so it’s imperative to make the right choice.