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USED BIKE REVIEW: 2015 – 2019 Kawasaki KLX 110 | Back End | Bike Reviews | Features | Kids' Corner | Used Bikes

The KLX 110 is a fantastic bike for beginners and kids. The low seat and forgiving power make the bike comfortable for riders who are just starting out or lacking confidence.

The steel frame is sturdy and so is the suspension. The only time this bike seems to have trouble is when adults decide to give it a thrashing or advanced kids start sending it off jumps. The suspension and frame can handle some airtime but it is not designed as an MX bike that can go into orbit.

I had to explain to one father only a week ago that the reason his son kept bending the fork in his KLX 110 was that the kid weighed 40kg more than the bike could handle and it was not designed to get airborne over a 10m tabletop. The father looked at me bewildered and asked what sort of bike he should be buying, to which I replied: “A 125 might be a good start”.

So if your child is a beginner who wants to learn to ride or you are looking to buy a bike that your kids can share then the KLX 110 is perfect. In fact, even mum can get on and have a go with the kids if she likes. The four-speed gearbox with semi-automatic clutch means that the rider does not need to worry about stalling the bike or operating a clutch lever.

Instead they can concentrate on their gear selection, which is a great stepping stone for a beginner who is starting to step up into the world of geared bikes.

CHECK TENSION
The KLX is an easy bike to live with and is easy enough to service at home. The air filter needs cleaning and re-oiling periodically and the oil needs to be changed regularly.

After each ride the chain will need oiling and the tension checked. The only other thing the bike could need from time to time is valve clearance adjustments and sparkplug changes, which are simple jobs for a bikeshop if this is not something you feel comfortable doing at home. When looking at buying a KLX 110, always give the bike a good look over. Look for any stress or damage to the frame and suspension components. Check the colour of the oil and ask to see the service history.

If the bike has been serviced regularly then the engines last very well but if the bike has rarely had oil changes then dirty lubricant can lead to a stretched timing chain or
worn piston and rings. Signs of these two things would be excessive smoke and engine rattles.

Listen to the engine for any abnormal noises and ride the bike to make sure it selects all gears and the clutch does not slip. Lastly, check over the suspension bushes. These can wear out but, luckily, they are not too expensive to replace.

Enjoy your bike, many families get hundreds of hours of enjoyment out in the bush and paddocks of Australia on these little machines. Technical Editor Mat Boyd

Newprices from redbook.com.au
2015 $2999
2016 $2999
2017 $3099
2018 $3199
2019 $3199
Second Hand
2015 $1850 – $2200
2016 $1900 – $2300
2017 $2000 – $2400
2018 $2150 – $2550
2019 $2300 – $2750